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20121121
20121121
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in gaza, president obama's top diplomat at the u.n. is facing angry politics in washington. susan rice, the president's u.n. ambassador and a leading candidate to replace clinton at the state department, has been subject to withering and sometimes outlandish attacks from a wide range of republicans. senators john mccain and lindsey graham, two foreign policy leaders have slammed rice for her initial comments about the source of the libya attacks with mccain threatening to filibuster if he's nominated. many other republicans have joined in. 97 members of the house sent the president a letter monday opposing rice. now president obama is not backing down. the white house has confirmed it's still considering promoting rice and last week the president said if mccain and graham want to go after someone, they should go after him. rice was not exactly a household name during obama's first term. but all this heat from the political players is drawing some media fire. "the new york times" maureen dowd has knocked rice as an unsavvy washington player. while the "times" editorial page came out wit
. but the person who is really taking the heat for that is our u.n. ambassador susan rice. you know, obviously there's been a lot of criticism of her. i think there's been a lot of attempts to make it clear she did exactly what anybody in her position would have done, with those talking points, given the situation we were in on that sunday when she went on the sunday shows. you know, some of the members of the congressional black caucus have raised the question, you know, would republicans be -- using a different tone if the ambassador -- the u.n. ambassador was white? here was senator graham's response. i want to play that and then let's talk about it. >> guys like you are being criticized by, for instance, members much the congressional black caucus, they say that you and john mccain are sexist and racists as well for criticizing ambassador rice. >> well, when you can't answer the question, you attack the questioner. the only color i'm worried about when it comes to benghazi is red, blood red. >> you know, congresswoman, i'll tell you what strikes me is i'm a little cautious about getting in
, he wants to bring the issue of palestinian statehood to u.n. on november 29. that too is a false road. there really isn't a palestinian way through the gun and through hamas. >> no military solution, frankly, to this conflict by either side. some sort of political solution down the road, but again, that road map seems very far off at this point. we're hearing some distant sounds of explosions, not anywhere in central gaza city, but sounds like far off in the distance. we're going to continue to broadcast from here, also from jerusalem from the israeli side of the border and the border towns that have been hard hit over the last seven to eight days. we're also going to talk to israel's ambassador to the u.s. when we come back. 44 @4p@4 >>> we just had an air alarm, it's going off right now. we're going to get into a safer place. it literally just went off as we got in the air. get this thing unplugged. let's get inside. >> please be safe. okay. >> we're going to move to a safer area. you still with me, suzanne? >> i am, fred. please do move to a safe area. if you have to disconnect, pl
the arab world against israel. >> let me tell you something about the arab world, gregg. i served at the u.n. for six years and i was there during the second world war, and i cannot even start telling you the number of prime ministers, kings and sultans from the arab world and said, go, finish the job, don't stop. there is no sympathy in the arab world for hamas. hamas is supported by iran. the only ones that want to see them survive and prevail is the iranians. they would celebrate if hamas was gone. gregg: i spent a lot of time in the west bank and down in gas aeu met with terrorist, i met with families of homicide bombers. one distinct impression i walked away with, for every terrorist there are ten willing to fill his or her shoes. again i ask the question, can hamas really be stamped out. >> you've been to the west bank and gaza and you see the difference. the west bank is thriving, the cities have great economies, great safety and security. and i believe at the end of the day that most palestinians want to live like that. they don't want to live in this world's largest prison hamas has
and to follow the u.n. benchmarks. and that's going to take time for president morsi, egyptian president morsi, to ensure hamas live up to its agreement especially with the cease-fire. >> david, who would you send? >> i don't think it matters. i don't think this is about personalities. this is a structural conflict. and peace will come when -- the kind of peace we're talking about will come when the palestinians make a strategic decision for peace. but what we can look forward to in the interim because that day is probably a long way off are a series of measures for better security. reinforcement of the wall, better separation of the israelis from the palestinians and tight policing of the flow of weaponry into gaza and better economic conditions for the palestinian population. many of whom are radicalized by unnecessary economic hardship. >> all right. i want to thank both of you for coming in today. once again happy thanksgiving to you. now we're going to go back to wolf blitzer who's in jerusalem. so how is that cease-fire holding up, wolf? >> so far it's holding up, joe. let's hope for the
. the un, everybody involved. egypt trying to broker peace also. what does the president need to do to move this process forward? >> he needs to get engaged. he needs to get engaged very seriously. i was struck this morning by looking at the papers, at the consensus expressed by "the washington post" editorial, which is very good, sometimes i disagree with them, but it's very good today, and a couple columnists on the op-ed page, and they all say the same thing which i endorse. namely, this is a real challenge to get at the heart of the problems. if we simply patch this up, somehow or other, between hamas and israel, be if we still patch it up a little bit between the palestinian authority and israel, we'll have a repetition in no time flat. but in the meantime two things are happening in the region, which are not going to be reversed easily. u.s. influence is declining, arab radicalism is intensifying. and that's not a good thing either for stability or the future of israel. >> how does the president engage most constructively to try to reverse at least one of those two trends to stop the
collateral damage. >> it's forced thousands of palestinian to turn to u.n. schools turned into makeshift shelters like this one. factions remain defiant. >> speaking about the cease-fire, boom, they're shooting off. >> israel warned it's prepared to invade gaza. for now, it's relying on the superior air power. overnight it struck tens of targets including this key bridge, effectively cutting gaza in half. while the rockets and missiles fly and efforts are in full swing, still anyone's guess which way this war will go. >> secretary of state clinton has arrived in cairo egypt and met with president mohammed morse i. the chances of them reaching a deal about the issues surrounding gaz are are extremely unlikely. they're looking to avert a ground war. >> thank you very much. here's savannah. >> matt, thanks. meantime, black friday is two days away now. the most important day of the year foror the nation's retaile. trouble may be brewing for one of the biggest ones of all. walmart. mark potter is live in doral, florida this morning. mark, good morning. >> good morning, savannah. about a thous
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7